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ROBIN GEORGE & DANGEROUS MUSIC Painful Kiss

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…It’s not the first time for such an endeavor, what with the axeman taking to the mic on DAMAGE CONTROL’s “Raw”, but the result is intimate now, rather than heroic, on the likes of “Love Power And Peace” as the composer stresses a strength of a song itself, not only of its message. The anguished honesty of his delivery zooms out from the universal to personal in the fresh-fashioned title track – all sparse melange of sharp riffs, angular strum and Eastern weave – and, following a reference to angels, in an updated look at “Heaven” which is an epitome of an almost orchestral affection here. The vibrant reprise of “Oxygen” may seem to symbolize the insularity of Robin’s today’s approach, and not for nothing George, with a blues edge to most of the numbers, is boiling down the decisiveness of “The Rubicon” to his and Pete Haycock’s rapport.

Still, there’s a crisp funk thrown onto “Pride” after the guitarist has pushed Ruby Turner’s wail to the back, while the infectious chorus and Mel Collins’ sax make the heavy, if sensual, “Catarina” stand out, but “World” offers dry crunch that’s gradually wetted with a slider to soften the writer’s acidic critique of our current ways. That’s why here’s a lot of love in these grooves: because it is all we need, as painful as it may be. ****

DMME.net (July 2016)


Over the years Britain’s Robin George has worked with an amazing array of great classic artists including Robert Plant, Glenn Hughes, Phil Lynott, David Byron, Roy Wood (!), John Wetton, and Pete Way. But he’s also recorded an impressive number of solo albums that have caught the attention of many.

On Painful Kiss , George presents his own recordings of songs that were recorded previously or made famous by other musicians. In addition, the album presents three new tracks that were written specifically for this release. Our guess is that these tracks will become the definitive recordings of many of these songs. These cuts have a nice thick fat produced sound with plenty of overdubs that add additional zest. And of course those remarkable guitars remain the trademark of Robin’s sound. Twelve nifty zippy cuts here including “Painful Kiss,” “Lonesome Daze,” “Pride,” “Love, Power and Peace” and “Oxygen.”

babysue (June 2016)


‘The American Way’ is where Charlie Morgan hits hard, despite few guitar interventions from Robin. It is However, my favourite track, surrounded by a bass groove. Another of my favourites is the bluesy ‘Bluesong’ where Robin demonstrates how successful it can be when he does not try to please at all costs, because when his guitar awakens, the music takes off…

Highlands Magazine (Translated – June 2016)


Openers ‘Painful Kiss’ and ‘Lonesome Daze’ – both still poppy with a metal edge – kick-start things nicely, and nod stylistically back to 1985 and George’s first solo album, albeit with a twenty-first century twist. ‘The American Way’ is a snappy little pup originally recorded with Glenn Hughes (this version unfortunately still lurks in the vaults, officially at least) and the coupling of ‘Catarina’, complete with sax solo from the legendary Mel Collins, and ‘The Rubicon’ is pretty much worth the price of the album alone: if your toes aren’t tapping by this point in the album you’d best check you still have a pulse.

John Tucker (May 2016)


If you’ve never encountered the work of Robin George before, I’ve no hesitation in suggesting that Painful Kiss is a wonderful place to start. For those more acquainted with his impressive output, the chance to hear some old favourites alongside some newer numbers given the full Robin George treatment, will prove simply too good to pass up.

Sea Of Tranquility (May 2016)

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GO WEST UK LIVE DATES!

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Catch Go West live in 2016!

October 7th – Go West Ladies Lunch, Maidstone
November 25th – Churchill Theatre, Bromley
December 9th – Robin 2, Bilston
December 11th – The Stables, Milton Keynes
December 23rd – Indigo at The 02, London

Click here to order your copy of the new CD/DVD set ‘Live Robin 2 – 2003′ now!

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RED JASPER 777

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The meaningful lyrics explore human nature, religion and beliefs within compact songs with clear vocals, strong melodies and catchy hooks plus plenty of synthesiser and guitar; it’ll sound great live.

Opening with the catchy up-tempo track called ’7′ there’s nice keyboard-melodies and synth-washes (Lloyd George), supporting DC’s lead vocal. ‘She Waits’ is a great head-nodding rocker featuring some splendid guitar work (Robin Harrison) and is cleverly arranged with some Purson-like psychedelic moments and should be a live favourite.

‘Forth Of Fife’ has lovely synth swathes and another highlight is ‘The Gathering’ with up-front keys, plus great bass and strong guitar work with a lovely Marillion-tinged instrumental mid-section…777 delivers well-balanced enjoyable end-to-end listens.

Classic Rock Society (August 2016)


The band has almost completely abandoned the real folky elements in their music; no tin whistles, no mandolin, no traditional folk melodies. Instead you get catchy synth themes and poppy vocal melodies as on the opener 7, a real waltz on She Waits, and metal riffing in The Gathering. They produce very poppy choruses (Nothing to Believe) and re-work the leading theme of Forth of Fife in the next song (The Gathering) without gluing the songs together. There the strength of the vocal lines becomes very apparent. Clifford manages to sing the long lyric lines without any obvious strain, and makes these songs fluid and melodious….

Bonus track October and April is a cover of The Rasmus featuring Annette Olzon song, jointly sung by Clifford and his stunning musical, dancing and acting daughter Soheila. It is a rather cheesy and folky ballad, with acoustic guitar and spinet-like keys sounds that reminded me of the Dan Fogelberg/Emmylou Harris duet Only The Heart May Know on the Innocent Age album. Their voices blend together very well and the sober-but-effective arrangement makes this potential lamentable song a really nice one to listen to. I highly prefer it over the original. 8/10

Dutch Progressive Rock Page (July 2016)


Folk approaches have not entirely disappeared, but are now less frequent. This is perhaps most clear on the track “She Waits”, which is really rocking – a beautiful piece. Among the highlights include the great opener “7″ and the pop/prog “Reaching out” with its anthemic vocals and detailed synth solos. The soft synth number “Paradise Folly” is an excellent album closer.

Musik An Sich (Translated – June 2016)


…’Dragonfly’ includes an introduction with acoustic guitar but the tone in general is again neo-prog. ‘Paradise Folly’ is like JETHRO TULL: a beautiful ballad on acoustic guitar, with romantic keyboards, a beautiful voice, loads of emotion and a Gilmouresque solo. ‘October and April’ is an unplugged bonus track with the addition of a female voice. I do not know if all this will please the old fans, but they will gain more fans, because RED JASPER took a serious facelift with this album.

Highlands Magazine (Translated – June 2016)


777 is vintage prog-rock – it should have been recorded in 1974. Lloyd George’s keyboards are the key sound that grounds the album, not with Wakemanesque flight of fancy – well, not much – but with solid swathes of sound. The bass and drums are equally solid with Harrison’s guitars doing the rest. ‘Reaching Out’ is a prime example of the way the band works…there’s a bonus track, a cover of ‘October and April’ from Finnish band The Rasmus to emphasise Red Jasper’s credentials. If you like your rock music layered in pomp and circumstance, you’ll love this.

R2 Magazine (May 2016)


…with “Reaching Out” bringing a brighter tone to proceedings and Robin Harrison’s early Rothery inspired guitar styling taking hold, it’s a genuine, classy highlight of this album. As with the band’s precious release, lyrically the work of writer Clive Barker has inspired the exploration of human nature, religion and belief. Along with an intriguing album cover that evokes the most recent series of American Horror Story (Hotel), the imagery, both physical and mental is strong. When Red Jasper really hit their stride, they easily match that level of atmosphere.

Sea Of Tranquility (May 2016)


The band’s eagerly anticipated follow-up set mines a similar melodic vein as the five musicians explore the vagaries of the human condition via the refreshingly uncluttered delights of ‘Forth Of Fife’, ’7′ and ‘Paradise Folly’.

Kevin Bryan, Regional Newspapers (April 2016)


The glossy anxiety of “7″ introducing a new set of rules, now erstwhile long instrumental passages have left ample room for David Clifford’s vocals that launch the heavy raga of “Blessed With Gold” on a deliciously high note, although sometimes words seem to twist the tunes into slightly repetitive patterns. As a result, the melody which unites “The Gathering” with “Forth Of Fife” could have outstayed its welcome and drown the “Firth of Forth / Firth Of Fifth” reference if not for the songs’ additional turns and distinctly different arrangements. So where others would indulge in countless time signatures, RJ wrap the verses of “She Waits” in waltz and harden its choruses to rock riffs, while giving the despondency of “Nothing To Believe” an anthemic bounce.

Still, where Lloyd George’s cosmic synthesizers make “Reaching Out” a typical art-rock ballad, “Paradise Folly” gets down to an acoustic, spiritual foundation of it all, something that’s stressed on a bonus cover of THE RASMUS’ “October And April” as DC and his daughter Soheila (whose solo album is long overdue) deliver a dramatic duet. There might always be seven reasons not to see it clear, but with “777″ RJ clear this view in spectacular fashion. ****

DMME.net (April 2016)

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THE REAL THING Live At The Liverpool Philharmonic 2013 CD

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Sometimes mixing funk, disco, jazz, the audience enjoys this exhibition of rhythms and swing, combined with a saxophone always played with great precision. ‘Ain’t No Stopping Us Now’ is a real pressure cooker ready to explode…Among the bonus tracks is a cover of The Beatles’ ‘Eleanor Rigby’, ‘The Kid Ain’t Mine’ is a title based around percussion and bass, and ‘Tug Of War’ (Paul McCartney) is completely rearranged. THE REAL THING show they are kings of rhythm and blues.

Highlands Magazine (Translated – June 2016)


The band achieved huge success in the U.K. in the late ’70s with three hit singles; “Can’t Get By Without You”, “Can You Feel The Force” and “You To Me Are Everything”. All three tracks are found in this set and offer some nice soul/pop grooves with good lead vocal and harmonies and slick rhythmic grooves. The first track “Street Corner Boogie” is a silky smooth pop/soul confection backed by a funky bass line and melodic sax lines. “Raining Through My Sunshine” is another uplifting track with catchy guitar rhythms and sax while “Whenever You Want My Love” has a slight disco groove as does their hit “Can You Feel The Force”. The playing is good throughout, nothing earth shattering but the grooves are tight and the vocals are catchy. If you enjoy soul music of the ’70s this should bring some good vibes your way.

Sea Of Tranquility (May 2016)


It’s impossible to resist the rhythm changes of the 11-minute “The L8 Medley” as well as the mellifluous throb of “Cry Me A River” whose chorus marries past to the future, and the insistent jive makes “Can You Feel The Force” a rhetorical question. Strong as ever, the ensemble’s new studio tracks – beats-driven bonuses here – including the update of fellow Liverpudlians’ “Eleanor Rigby” is a testament to TRT’s vitality: that’s the focus of this package. ****

DMME.net (March 2016)

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MATCHBOX Going Down Town

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…now released for the first time worldwide on this budget priced CD. All of the 12 rock ‘n’ roll and rockabilly tracks are written or co-written by leader Hodgson and include numbers such as ‘Nothing To Do But Rock And Roll All Day’, ‘She’s Hot’, ‘Roller Skating Sally’ and ‘Flip Flop Floosie’.

Bev Bevan (March 2016)


MATCHBOX ‘Going Down Town’ represents a fine tribute to a bygone era and succeeds only too well in re-creating the sounds of the greats. All 12 tracks on this re-release were written by Brian Hodgson – a versatile guitarist and also former Rutles founder-member. And a pretty fine job he did too!

Music-News (March 2016)


Vocal harmonies stacked around Graham Fenton’s mellifluous yelp and the sting of Gerry Hogan’s guitars, steel and otherwise, make “Flip Flop Floosie” irresistible and “Shooting Gallery” – penned by bassist Brian Hodgson, an original Rutle, and taken to the charts by Shakin’ Stevens in 1980 – a booming joy, while “Hot Love” snaps to the boogie shout-a-rama.

DMME.net (March 2016)


If you enjoy old school rock and roll and don’t mind the clock being turned back, oh about sixty years or so, Going Down Town will be a very enjoyable nostalgic ride that is just plain fun to listen to. Recommended for fans of Eddie Cochran, Buddy Holly and ’50s rock music in general.

Sea Of Tranquility (February 2016)

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ANDREW CRESSWELL DAVIS Emergency Love

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‘Ghost Of Love’ starts with a vocoder and is accompanied by strings, a composition that lives as a drama, with remarkable vocal work. An incredible album, beautifully balanced offering us wonders, sensitivity and emotion…

Highlands Magazine (Translated – June 2016)


Emergency Love is a gently-rocking affair constructed around the delicate songs, deft guitar and keyboards backed by a line-up including Stackridge’s violinist Clare Lindley and drummer Eddie John along with pedal steel supremo EJ Cole. Songs such as ‘Charlie’s Dead’ and ‘Rain Rain Rain’ show the tuneful sensitivities that Davis bought to his previous outfits, but there’s a sense of coming of age on others including ‘Loving You Too Long’ which edges towards the likes of Randy Newman. There’s often a country touch and even gospel overtones with choral backing vocals, particularly on the title track…

Record Collector Magazine (April 2016)


At first glance Emergency Love may seem, from an artist known for chopping and changing styles and approach, a little too straight forward in its ethos. However, strong songs and excellent musicianship will always shine brightly and on Emergency Love that light breaks through confidently from start to finish.

Sea Of Tranquility (April 2016)


The title track itself is an excellent example of how to take a tender theme, present it in a reasonably traditional singer songwriter setting and simply allow the music to speak for itself. Whether the gentle stroll of “Downtown Lights”, the understated yet insistent “Magdelene”, which I could easily imagine Mark Knopfler singing, or “Charlie’s Dead” which contains an authentic country rock vibe, it’s hard not to get caught up in the believable manner with which Davis delivers the vocals. Add in some quite wonderful arrangements, where a deceptively simple sheen allows some seriously intricate work to feel smooth and unforced and it’s no surprise everything here works so well.

Sea Of Tranquility (March 2016)


The knock on heaven’s door, taking a hymnal turn in the title track, may stop at the sparse skank of “Nightfishing” with its steel guitars’ twang, while “Charlie’s Dead” paints patinated pictures on the way down memory lane towards “Downtown Lights” – a darkened cover of THE BLUE NILE’s ballad. Yet, as if to oppose “Peacock Of The Universe” referring to wisdom-preachers, who the artist hates rather than weirdos he likes, “Loving You Too Long” is a Shakespeare-citing soulful anthem which picks up where Otis’ classic left off. What’s left when the passion has burned, then? Look for the answer in the orchestral swell behind “The Ghost Of Love”: a dramatic, if soothing, finale to a warm, welcoming record – a beacon for those who feel lonesome tonight. ****

DMME.net (March 2016)


As the leader of such sturdy English bands as Stackridge and the Korgis, Andy Davis built a career that will see him through old age with substantial songwriting royalties. Both gigs were known for their idiosyncratic approach to pop, and his new solo album strives for eclecticism within a narrower tonal range. With his hoarse voice and mid-tempos, Davis seems to be cruising, and if the tongue-in-cheek ambitions that made the Korgis such a vital addition to the new wave canon are missed, there’s no shortage of great tunes and clever lines. Blues and trad are the preferred modes of presentation, but Davis’s pop instincts make sure the songs are concise and the arrangements serviceable. It’s what used to be referred to as a “journeyman’s record,” one whose merits are difficult to repeat, except that Davis has been repeating them his entire professional life.

EL Magazine (February 2016)

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THE HONEYCOMBS 304 Holloway Road Revisited

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Written, as was a bulk of this CD – including that hit, given a flamenco finish now – by Ken Howard and Alan Blaikley, it’s a vigorous upgrade of the collective’s classic pieces, although, as far as embracing modern technology goes, the new versions have a deliberately patinated audio veneer, sticking to the ’70 MOR patterns. The scintillating charm of Murray’s “Leslie Anne” – whose punchy groove and twang come kissed by glittery keyboard chords and wrapped in lush strings – is undeniable, yet such trimmings haven’t been applied to the Angelo Deacon-delivered “Without You It’s Night” which delicately bares the band’s depth. Also emotional, cosmic exploration might be well hidden in the boisterous, bass-propelled “Bring Your Heart With You” but it’s manifested in the arrangements of Meek-penned cuts – in the echoing strum of “Totem Pole 9″ and the lap steel modulations of “Please Don’t Pretend Again” – while the folk harmonies turn “It’s So Hard To Love You” on its head.

DMME.net (May 2016)


Highlights include the irresistible and acoustically driven “It’s Crazy But I Can’t Stop”, the feel good ’60s flavoured sheen on the upbeat “Leslie Anne” and “Mary Joe” and of course the reworked “Have I The Right?” with its slow building guitar arpeggios and beautiful melody. The sound is quite lush and the vocal harmonies are spot on as they are throughout the album as is the exceptional guitar work. The catchy keyboard melody and head sticking arrangement in “Love In Tokyo” is another highly listenable earworm as is the heartwarming ballad “Without You It’s Night” supplemented with lovely acoustic guitar and violin…You won’t find anything progressive here, just fourteen well written pop songs that drip with 60′s nostalgia rearranged for the modern era.

Sea Of Tranquility (April 2016)


…a triumph both artistically, aesthetically and musically. A truly wonderful CD packed full of superb performances and arrangements. It can be recommended without hesitation to all music fans and collectors. Also, a fitting tribute to Joe Meek / RGM. It is also a very joyous CD to listen to…

Joe Meek Newsletter (April 2016)


Martin Murray wanted to utilise the technology now available to re-imagine, rework and re-arrange The Honeycombs songs and keep to the spirit of Holloway Road…So do these reworkings work? Yes in the main they do and I get Martins desire to put a new take on things.

HITR becomes a slower tempo orchestral country tinged affair as opposed to the Dave Clark style stomper it was back in the day. Opening tracks ‘Leslie Anne’ and ‘Mary Jo’ both uptempo numbers sound fresh and ‘retro’ at the same time and there is no doubting the musical ability on display. Totem Pole 9 (theme from Howards Way) yes. you read that right! manages to come away sounding like a homage to the Tornados ‘Telstar’ Deliberate? don’t know but brought a smile to my face…overall as aforementioned Martin has made a refreshing, enjoyable and engaging album.

ninebattles (March 2016)


Founder member Martin Murray – guitar and supporting vocals – has been recalling the group’s brief time in the mid-Sixties spotlight with some newly arranged recordings made by a present-day line-up of Honeycombs. The 14 tracks obviously include a rendition of the stomping ‘Have I the Right?’ – and a return to ‘That’s The Way’, another song written by the hot team of Ken Howard and Alan Blaikley, and which reached number 12 in 1965.

The Beat (March 2016)


Now well into his seventies, Murray still sounds good vocally and there was never any doubt about his proficiency as a guitar player. Get this album as a birthday pressie for your granddad – but give it a go first and put your troubles aside for a brief while.

Music-News (March 2016)


The album’s piece de resistance is a brand-new arrangement of “Have I The Right?” which is like no other version you have ever heard! The majority over the years have all leant towards The Honeycombs original, and it would have been easy enough for yet another one to have been included on 304 Holloway Road Revisited. There is a slow build up to “Have I the right to touch you…”, a gentle acoustic-style guitar solo, and then “come right back” fading to an echo at the end. Brilliant!

“Colour Slide” is belted out and is not too dissimilar to the opening track on The Honeycombs LP. “Without You It’s Night” starts off with bird song over a guitar intro, and guest vocalist Angelo Deacon sensitively handling this as a ballad reminiscent of those by Justin Hayward. “It’s So Hard To Love You” turns into an unique barbershop-cum-country number. Linda, sounding somewhat like Glenda Collins, does sterling work on “Something I’ve Got To Tell You Baby”. “Totem Pole” is a fairly straightforward instrumental, the original being by Peter Jay and The Jaywalkers (1963); and, finally, “Too Way Out” winds everything up with its familiar boisterousness.

What a treat is in store for everyone who buys a copy!

The Honeycombs Newsletter (March 2016)

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TYGERS OF PAN TANG Noises From The Cathouse

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Among the more complex compositions, worth mentioning are the experimental “Cybernation” and subtle “Deja Vu” whose rhythm sections are the highlight, not to mention the captivating “Master Of Illusion”. The real centrepiece of about nine minutes, this piece appears as a kaleidoscope of TOPT and concludes with a long solo at an almost doom tempo. For the rest, the mid-tempo “Godspeak” stands out with unusual vocal lines combined with choirs. “Running Man” is more traditional but still effective. Via the epic power ballad, “The Spirit Never Dies” the Hammond sounds enter the scene…To summarize, “Noises From The Cathouse” is an interesting album, pleasant, varied and flawlessly solid at all levels. In 2016, it rose from the ashes to finally get the recognition it deserves. Take the opportunity to discover this album and this band.

Odymetal (Translated – May 2016)


Starting with a playful blast of “Bad Bad Kitty” and signing off with the equally tuneful “Master Of illusion” whose tempo shifts and lyrical flow bare the metal-laden depth of it all, this record refines TOPT’s trademark double-barrel assault on “High Speed Highway Superman” while in the molten prayer of “Cybernation” Dean Robertson’s axe cuts the second six-string’s strum in a lyrical way.

The tightness-and-release method is what the band excel at, best illustrated by “Running Man” and its bluesy licks sprinkled over the groove as Richie Wicks is bemoaning the fate of a questing spirit, although a reckless rock ‘n’ rolling of “Three In A Bed” may vie with the epics for attention. There’s a lot of anger, peaking in “Godspeak” to the punches of Brian West’s bass, yet it’s well balanced with fun, and the re-recording of “Don’t Touch Me There” from the ensemble’s debut – one of the bonuses on this reissue – only stresses their development and relevance. The TYGERS still roar: a solid noise it is. ***1/2

DMME.net (April 2016)


…one thing is certain, this tiger always has sharp fangs with this album being no exception – guitar riffing, epic solos, tempos, and good raspy vocals. It opens with a bang with ‘Bad Bad Kitty’, glam rock yet boosted with a voice like Bon Scott, and Robb Wier’s exciting solos…

…’Three In A Bed’ is a track like old time Van Halen, and ‘Master Of Illusion’ has very thick guitars and a killer riff.

There are three bonus tracks from the album sessions, still full of the crazy guitar of Robb Wier. It’s uncompromising, as Robb assumes the role of guitar hero with his playing melting ice faster than global warming! Hard rock, this is the business of the Tygers! (***)

Highlands Magazine (Translated – April 2016)


…with “Three In A Bed” (whatever could that be about?) an out and out homage to Roth fronted Van Halen through its bouncy beat, party like chorus and Wicks’ deep, leering spoken word section, there’s much more to this version of TOPT than you may think.

“Bad Bad Kitty” keeps up the (ahem) tasteful lyrical themes, yet while the words may hint more at the eighties than the noughties, what Tygers have done here is to keep the essence of their sound while spreading their wings to add influences as wide and varied as Extreme, Faith No More and in the case of “…Kitty” a more sleazy slap.

…In many ways the NWOBHM tag has been a curse for countless bands and Tygers Of Pan Tang are no exception. Here they prove once again that they have many more strings to their fret boards than the sub genre suggests. Noises From The Cathouse is a rediscovered album genuinely worth the time taken to rediscover it.

Sea Of Tranquility (March 2016)


The disk opens with the powerful and gloomy “Boomerang”, introduced by a mild and persuasive theme with violin and piano. The next development is played on a very well constructed contrast between arpeggiated parts (dark and suggestive) and moments of more direct impact, with imposing riffing, fulminating and fully supported by the bass / drums rhythm section.

The voice of the former Angel Witch Ritchie Wicks is well set and drag properly, especially in the pounding refrain. It continues with “Godspeak” and is an almost dissonant riff, then supported by a lilting rhythmic base but compelling. The riffing of Weir is processed and delightful especially in the main refrain…The result is really interesting.

The next track “Masters of Illusion”, demonstrates once again their ability to create melodic textures with long, dark and powerful riffs…”Highspeed Highway Superman” definitely changes the atmosphere, concentrating one’s attention on more sustained rhythmic and dynamic heavy-riffing and catchy rock, embellished with a good solo.

In conclusion, this “Noises from the Cathouse” is a good album…Here you will find a range of atmospheres and sounds that will please both lovers of old school metal and those who grew up listening to the latest sounds.

Truemetal.it (February 2016)


“Noise from the Cathouse” is a solid hard rock disc with occasional metallic approaches. “Boomerang” is a great rhythmic track featuring quite heavy guitars, and “Three In A Bed” is a real ‘rock ‘n’ roll’ number…the album also features two classics “Slave To Freedom” and “Don’t Touch Me There” as bonus tracks, that enhance the re-release…

Musik An Sich (February 2016)


Considering its time of recording, the album is filled to the brim with surprisingly unadulterated heavy metal, its roots still firmly embedded in the NWOBHM subculture that sprung to life in the late seventies. Doesn’t make them bad people of course. There’s an honesty to this material – produced by Chris Tsangarides – that is infinitely preferable to the sneering, condescending undertone that runs through the so called post rock irony of a few contemporary AOR bands.

‘Highspeed Highway Superman’ and ‘Running Man’ see the machine ramped up to reach an hypnotic momentum. These tracks and others – ‘Three In A Bed’ for instance – just hum with kinetic energy. ‘Bad Bad Kitty’ and ‘Godspeak’ are opposite sides of the same coin. One seems to pursue the glam, stack heeled direction of travel, while the other’s funereal call and response vocals display the band’s ability to wed a muscular brand of heavy metal to their earlier, darker inclinations.

Darker still, ‘Cybernation’ and ‘The Spirit Never Dies’ are just the warm up for the epic, 3 act, 9 minute ‘Master Of Illusion’, a stately, majestic exploration of the genre, teasing us with an unconsummated dalliance with Progressive rock. There are echoes here of one of the bonus tracks, ‘Slave to Freedom’, originally from the 1980 debut, Wildcat, whose prescient time changes were something of a clue to the musical temptations that almost turned their heads, at the beginning of their recording career.

Of the other 2 bonus tracks, one is a new, streamlined mix of ‘Highspeed Highway Superman’, and the other a cleverly arranged rework of ‘Don’t Touch Me There’, a track that also originally appeared on the band’s debut album. All 3 bonus tracks were re-recorded in 2004, planned as album extras for the Japanese market.

There are some brief but informative liner notes here, delineating the band’s 35 year history, including an interview with founder Robb Weir, and a few fascinating (and evocative) photos.

The Midlands Rocks (January 2016)


Fast-forward thirteen years and ‘Noises’ has now been given a new lease of life via Angel Air. The revamped album features new artwork, a shuffled running order that redefines the dynamism of the original ten songs, and three bonus tracks which take the running time up to a hefty 75 minutes. The material certainly hasn’t lost its bite over the intervening years, and songs like the huge, sprawling ‘Master Of Illusion’ is just one example of the band’s ability to create a grandiose metal epic, while the haunting but power chord laden ‘Cybernation’ is as dystopian as its title suggests.

The bonus tracks were recorded in 2004 and feature album cut ‘Highspeed Highway Superman (Two Wheeled Version)’ alongside the debut album classic ‘Slave To Freedom’ and debut single classic ‘Don’t Touch Me There’…they do round off a rather exciting re-issue rather nicely.

John Tucker (January 2016)


The original release has now been fleshed out a little with the addition of three bonus tracks and should be required listening for devotees of melodic hard rock everywhere, with ‘Highspeed Highway Superman’ and ‘Godspeak’ emerging as the pick of a punchy package.

Kevin Bryan, Regional Newspapers (January 2016)

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THE REFORM CLUB Never Yesterday

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Never Yesterday is folky: that’s right, THE REFORM CLUB, a mix of folk and rock with a perfume of the sixties, but it does not lack communicative energy. From the opening track ‘Daffodil Cottage’ we already know we are dealing with professionals who have a sense of rhythm. All these titles are sung by Norman and his voice is strong, I do not know if he was singing at the Commons but in THE REFORM CLUB he’s doing really well.

Highlands Magazine (Translated – June 2016)


…Elsewhere, though, affairs of the heart take over foreign affairs, and little tragedies such as ones behind the whimsical “The Man Next Door” or the “One Way Love” blues are the order of the day.

In this context, acoustically driven numbers of a singer-songwriter disposition – like “Point Me To The Truth” – make a lot of sense. Not for nothing the punk defiance of opener “Daffodil Cottage” with its naked guitar riff gets diluted in the song’s soft chorus and psyched-up passages, and “Shopping” is mocking consumerism in the kindest way possible – as a means for a meaningful social life.

So while the twang in “Time Hangs” sounds ominous, its refrain is a harbor of hope, and “Teapot Lane” hitches a catchy approach to criticism of today’s Blighty. But then, there’s luminous wisdom in the title track, a refusal to cast a glance back, just because it won’t help us move on. One way love might be a step forward, really.****

DMME.net (April 2016)


Never Yesterday’s meticulous political editorial makes it worth a spin, but where the album blossoms is through its inherent honesty. Love and life flutter among the words with such cordial belonging it is almost like opening a diary; and that intimacy gives this album its heart.
The Badger, University Of Sussex Students’ Newspaper (March 2016)


Whichever song you listen to you can be rest assured of some clever pop music that is as catchy as anything you are likely to hear this year. If you enjoy a little slice of the ’60s every now and then you really can’t go wrong with Never Yesterday.

Sea Of Tranquility (March 2016)


Standout track Give War a Chance is an irresistible critique of Blair’s warmongering, with the opening refrain “I am an envoy for peace/But I’ve got war on my mind/I’ve dealt with Iraq, I’m shafting Iran/Syria watch your behind” carrying a wholly correct prediction, chastising Cameron’s bombing whist uncovering the root of the madness with a heat seeking intensity any general would be proud of. Juxtaposed to a creeping folky instrumental, Baker and Mike Phipp’s lyrics are given a platform no parliamentary speech can rival.

The Reform Club also excel at old-school Rock and Roll ballads of longing and loss, with One Way Love and That Girl giving the album a genuine sense of authenticity; the former dealing with the age-old issue of loving one who will never reciprocate, the latter echoing the same notion in a flurry of minor chords and a chorus “That girl, That girl, I am in love but she’s leagues above me” that is simultaneously simplistic yet byzantine…

…Never Yesterday’s meticulous political editorial makes it worth a spin, but where the album blossoms is through its inherent honesty. Love and life flutter among the words with such cordial belonging it is almost like opening a diary; and that intimacy gives this album its heart.

Glenn Houlihan, Sussex University Magazine (February 2016)


‘The Man Next Door’ is a whimsical tale (told in ballad-style) about a fella called Ben who works off the Old Kent Road, claims to make a mint yet is always skint, and forever borrows a tenner of which our lyrical protagonist knows he’ll never get it back. Bless the Old Kent Road and its periphery, seemingly inhabited by colourful characters worth a tale, and forever inspiring artists to write that tale. Another amusing song is ‘Shopping’ an urban saga about the delights and possible pitfalls any serious shopaholic might encounter.

…An excellent album for music lovers who like to be ‘stimulated’ while listening to songs and hey, some of the content might even spark a debate or two – no, you won’t fool the children of the revolution.

Music-News (January 2016)


They are reminiscent of The Beatles, The Kinks, etc. Tony Blair has been criticized in “Give War a Chance,” with references to the war in Iraq and Iran. Something as mundane as shopping gets a slap in “Shopping”. For lovers of retro pop.

Keys and Chords (December 2015)

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JOE EGAN Out Of Nowhere

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Out Of Nowhere was produced by David Courtney, who also produced Leo Sayer, Roger Daltrey and Adam Faith. He is quoted as saying “The album reflected where Joe was at this time of life and career following on from his split with Gerry Rafferty which I felt was evident in some of his lyrics”. I can only agree after listening to such songs as ‘Ask No Favours’, ‘Why Let It Bother You’, ‘The Last Farewell’, ‘No Time For Sorrow’, and ‘Leaving It All Behind’.

Bev Bevan (March 2016)


With some of the less than stellar albums that have been given copious reassessments and reissues over the years, it really is amazing that an album this good has sat on the shelf for more than three and a half decades. Credit to Angel Air Records and Joe Egan for righting that wrong. With interesting liner notes from Egan’s brother Kevin, comments from the album producer David Courtney (who did a great job of capturing the relaxed vibe, yet making it sound vibrant) and a full set of lyrics, Out Of Nowhere really is an excellent re-release. Hopefully Map is next, however even more interestingly, the liner notes also hint at other previously unreleased Egan recordings seeing the light of day. Until then, get set to welcome Out Of Nowhere in from the cold. It’ll warm your heart if you do.

Sea Of Tranquility (March 2016)


Up until now Out of Nowhere was only available on vinyl. The years have been kind to this album. Thanks to producer David Courtney and Angel Air’s Peter Purnell, Egan’s long lost album can once again be heard by old fans as well as an entirely new audience.

Today these songs would fit somewhere in the folk/pop/Americana genres. What impresses us most about these tracks is the fact that they don’t sound the least bit dated. Joe wrote some great songs for this album that surely should have received more attention than they did when originally released. Hopefully this Angel Air release will bring this album to the attention of a much larger audience…The accompanying booklet offers notes from Egan’s younger brother Kevin as well as David Courtney. Top notch stuff, recommended. Top pick.

babysue (January 2016)


…the songs ooze an understated joy drenched in sensual orchestration yet leaning towards country-rock’s wind of adventure – full of soft harmonies, ‘Freeze’ wouldn’t sound out of place on an EAGLES record – so there’s a nice balance between delicate pining of ‘Natural High’ and the communal delight of ‘The Last Farewell’ where Gallagher and Lyle join in. But while a vaudeville whiff in ‘Ask For No Favours’ and the bluesy call-and-response in ‘Pride’ bridge this gap with a mischievous smile, ‘Why Let It Bother You’ wraps a worry into a sweet skank, and ‘No Time For Sorrow’ dries any occasional tear which fogs Egan’s eyes. Still, it’s ‘Leaving It All Behind’ that rocks with a righteous resolution and arresting abandon, as befits an artist who’s just cut loose and is having the time of his life.

An obscure gem of Scottish rock, the album has long been up for rediscovery; now it’s time to love it. ****3/4

DMME.net (January 2016)


It’s a fine piece of work, occupying much the same musical territory as Rafferty’s ‘Night Owl’ and blessed with a clutch of subtly memorable tracks led by ‘Back On The Road’, ‘Why Let It Bother You’ and ‘The Last Farewell’.

Kevin Bryan, Regional Newspapers (December 2015)


With some of the less than stellar albums that have been given copious reassessments and reissues over the years, it really is amazing that an album this good has sat on the shelf for more than three and a half decades. Credit to Angel Air Records and Joe Egan for righting that wrong.

With interesting liner notes from Egan’s brother Kevin, comments from the album producer David Courtney (who did a great job of capturing the relaxed vibe, yet making it sound vibrant) and a full set of lyrics, Out Of Nowhere really is an excellent re-release.

Hopefully Map is next, however even more interestingly, the liner notes also hint at other previously unreleased Egan recordings seeing the light of day. Until then, get set to welcome Out Of Nowhere in from the cold. It’ll warm your heart if you do.

Sea Of Tranquility (December 2015)

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